Who is Evelyn?

I am an Outdoor Travel and Hiking Blogger.

I travel the world exploring the outdoors to appreciate all that our amazing world has to offer.
I am most inspired when hiking a new trail, watching wildlife, or venturing to a remote beach or waterfall.

My experience as an environmental educator and wildlife conservationist allows me a unique perspective.
I use this insight to share conservation considerations for visiting these destinations in a way that will be memorable and sustainable.

For more info, click here – About

Work with Me

I enjoy working with people and organizations who are passionate about exploring, hiking, and protecting our planet!

Let’s work together on:

– Custom travel itineraries
– Articles, Podcasts, Speaking Engagements, etc.
– Brand Collaborations

For more details, click here – Work with Me

How to Visit Salto de Baiguate

What if I told you that you could hike less than a mile round trip to see a stunning waterfall in the lush mountains of the Dominican Republic? In Jarabacoa, you can do just that by visiting Salto de Baiguate.  This scenic waterfall is part of a nature preserve designed to protect the biodiversity of the area.  I’ll give you all the details on how to find it, visit logistics, and details on the hike.

Close up view of Salto de Baiguate waterfall surrounded by muddy boulders and green vegetation.
The perfect waterfall hike

Finding Salto de Baiguate

The entrance to the falls is a short ten-minute drive from Jarabacoa.  Be aware that searching for “Salto de Baiguate” in GPS will lead you to a private gate that is not the entrance to the falls.  To find the falls, use the following information:

Baiguate Parking Lot – 39WJ+MG8, Jarabacoa 41000, Dominican Republic

On the main road from Jarabocoa, you’ll see the arrow to turn right for Calle Entrada Salto Baiguate.  The road immediately splits, bear Left. Follow signs for the Salto to the end (approximately 2 km). 

In most scenarios, this drive in should be fine in a regular car.  There is one area in the final stretch where there is some gravel that can have water across the road if there has been a lot of rain.  An SUV would be helpful in this scenario but only necessary in extreme cases.

Visit Logistics

I have been dreaming of seeing this destination for years! It was even more incredible than I imagined. Here’s the basic info you need to know:

Salto de Baiguate cascades from the cliff in the middle of a lush green forest into a calm but muddy pool below.
What dreams are made of!

Parking

Parking is limited and free, however, it is customary to tip the security team that monitors your vehicle as you leave. 

Bathrooms

The bathrooms are located behind the main office building, which is at the start of the trailhead.  There are no bathrooms along the trail.

Registration

The office is open from 8 AM to 6 PM.  To register your party you will need to provide the number of people including gender and nationality information.  We did not have to pay to register and were even given candy!

Packing

The mosquitos in this area can be relentless, especially after rain. A little bug spray before your hike will go a long way.

¡Vamanos!

A wooden sign with black script lettering says "600 mts al salto."
At the trailhead…

This hike is short and rewarding.  It is 600m each way (.37mi/.6km), making it 1200m roundtrip (.74mi/1.2km).  The path is an almost fully paved sidewalk through the forest.  As you meander, you will catch glimpses of Rio Baiguate down below.  You will also pass through stands of bamboo. Watch for potential fallen rock as you walk along the rock wall as there is evidence of prior rockfalls.

Viewing Salto de Baiguate

Once you reach the end of the path, you’ll hear the roar of the falls but will not be able to see them.  To see the reward at the end of the path, descend the 80 stairs that are waiting for you.  

Rocks line the perimeter of the shallow area pool at the base of Salto de Baiguate.

From the base of the stairs, you will be able to see and take some photos without ever entering the water. I chose to wade through the perimeter.  Even though it had been raining the last few days this area was still shallow. I didn’t swim here but it is common and allowed.  After the rains, the falls are stronger and the water is muddier.

I visited on a Saturday afternoon in March. It was the first nice day in a while during the rainy season.  I thought it would be crowded but was pleasantly surprised by how few people were there.  When we arrived there were about 15 other people.  We were the last to leave and had the place all to ourselves at the end.

Climbing the stairs is definitely the hardest part of this hike.  There is room to rest and let others pass.  

Stone steps with wooden railing snake their way down the forest hillside.
Be ready to feel the burn!

After you return to the trail at the top of the stairs, there is an option to go left to see the top of the waterfall.  This is a cool perspective to appreciate from the trail.  DO NOT enter the water or attempt to swim in this area.  It looks serene but is extremely dangerous.

Muddy calm water at the top of the waterfalls is surrounded by large gray boulders.
The deceptively calm pool at the top of the waterfall. (Do not enter the water here)

Salto de Baiguate Highlights

Conservation Considerations

  • There are trash bags hung strategically along the path.   Please use these to help preserve this beautiful destination.

Useful URLS

Expeditions with Evelyn Exclusive

For a post-hike meal with a view, head to Parador Corazon de Jesus. This open air restaurant provides the full Jarabacoa experience! Amazing mountain scenery, a large menu full of delicious Dominican food and drink staples, and reasonable prices.

Salto de Baiguate tumbles into a pool of calm water below.  The waterfall is surrounded by vibrant green trees and muddy brown and orange rocks.
Hasta la proxima vez…

Salto de Baiguate Final Thoughts

Are you adding this waterfall hike to your bucket list? Let me know if you’ve been here before.

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